Elastic Alphabets By Pratik Machchar – Review

Elastic Alphabets By Pratik Machchar – Review



elastic

What we love…

Great introduction to alphabet, ability to turn off sound and music

What we’d love to see…

removal of the new game icon from the front screen as it takes you to the app store and needs a parental gate

Summary

Elastic Alphabet is a wonderful introduction to the alphabet.  The individual letters give the child a chance to see and hear what letters are and the sounds they make.

Our Rating

 

Elastic Alphabets is an engaging app to teach young children about the 26 letters of the English alphabet. The app provides opportunities for kids to become familiar with both the upper and lower case letters.

When the app is opened, the child is shown a red balloon looking letter that to me represents the letter C with eyes and a tongue.  This letter quickly stretches to reveal the home page of the app.  On the home page, the player is faced with 4 red circles: The settings wheel, an owl on a branch with a new game leaf, an arrow and a circle with ABC.  The settings and new game icon have parental controls (press for 3 seconds).  The forward arrows takes the kids to the first page of the game, where they can choose which letter to begin with; while the ABC circle leads them to the letter A. It was a little unexpected, that when you touch the new game icon, it actually takes you to a page to buy new apps, not start a new game.

Within the settings there are different ways to customize the game (on off music, on off audio, upper/lower case, show titles, a suggestion button (email to developer), links to social media and a big present (which sends you to a page to buy more apps). I have to admit that there is an option to “show or hide the title text”, but I can’t see what it really does. The user guide is really not that useful.  There is no voice, only actions, leading the player to figure out what to do on each page. It would be nice to have some voice over instructions.

Exiting the setting section, brings you back to the home page, to start playing. Here there are 2 choices for game play. The first one, the arrow, sends this child to the page where they can choose the letter to play.  The ABC circle starts the child off on the letter A. In this option, the letters are presented on a shelf.  The youngster chooses a letter and off they go.  There is a long rectangular “window” with 2 balloons on the side of the alphabet.  I am not really sure what purpose it serves, except maybe to mark the progression of number of letters that have been completed (as the letters are completed the balloons fly higher?).  There is also an X at the top to bring the child back to the home page.

The second option of the ABC circle, brings you to the letter A. From this point, the game play is the same for each letter (and each option). On each letter page there are 4 icons, again, with the option of returning home. Or changing the game.

What happens next is a little hard to explain, but intuitive once playing.  The first activity for each letter, is a series of animations that show how the letter is written. The player needs to swipe in any direction to change to the next animation. If left unattended, they are prompted to do something.  There are 5 different animations for the letter formation part (tracing, a pencil, sticks, balls aligning and a black line drawing). These are iPad generated animations.  The children cannot trace, write or manipulate the icons to create the letters. This would be a great addition to the game. The letters are announced as the actions are being done. Once the 5 animations are done, if the child does not press the arrow, but swipes again, the sequences are repeated. Once the arrow is pressed the next set of animations is exposed. In this “section” the kids are shown a variety of different animations centered on words that that begin with the selected letter.  Again, there are a variety of scenarios for each “word” that can be accessed by swiping.  Once the arrow is pressed, another series of animations appear. After 3 pages, the next letter is presented.  And the cycle begins again. On the letter and word pages there is voice over, announcing the word that is shown.  Once the letter z is completed, there is an option to play again.

The graphics and animation are amazingly clear and colorful.  While not interactive, the app is engaging. The children I tried it with liked listening and watching, but did periodically try to move around the items on the page, or copy the patterns they were confronted with.

I would give Elastic Alphabets for youngsters that are just entering the world of letters.  What I really like about this app was the wide variety and engaging animations. A big asset to the app is the ability to do the alphabet in order or choose the specific one you want. An added feature that makes this a 4-star app is the voice overs attached to the animated words and letters

While not a lot of customizable options, there are a few to help with different levels of game play.  For the more distracted kids, turning the sound and background sounds on and off was great.

I really like that the app is colorful and animated. The multiple different animations are visually appealing and kept the kids interest. I like that there is an option is either run through the alphabet in order or choose the letter you want the child to work on. There is also a back arrow to allow the letter to be repeated.   I also like that if the page is not “activated” after a certain amount of time, the child is reminded what to do, with both visual and voice prompts. The voiceover voice is pleasant and the words are well pronounced.

Some of the things I don’t particularly like, and would like to see changed in a future build are mostly those that would make the app more “interactive” and hands on.   It would be great if the app would allow the children to trace the letters or move the items on the page around. I think this would increase the desirability of the app for older kids and maintain their interest for a longer time. There are only a limited number of pages where you can actually do something to the page (you can zip the zipper). If possible, it would be beneficial to have a setting that would make the letters to “disappear” or be marked for completion.

Another advantage that would be great is, if there were more options for different voices (adults, girl, boy, accent). As well, it would beneficial if there could be spoken instructions in the user guide. I would like to see the removal of the label of “new game” from the home screen and the big present from the settings.  The label and the present are misleading, as they really only link to more apps by the developer.

Elastic Alphabet is a wonderful introduction to the alphabet.  The individual letters give the child a chance to see and hear what letters are and the sounds they make.  The graphics are colorful and well animated.  As a sort of bonus, the app is an excellent introduction to the concept of cause and effect, as they must do something to advance and get a reaction from the app. Children of kindergarten age might find it lacking in extended play time. I would give this app a 4- start rating. With some minor changes and adaptations to this version, I would up the rating to a 5 star.

Elastic Alphabets® for kids

Elastic Alphabets® for kids : Educator recommended learning game for preschoolers
Elastic Alphabets® for kids : Educator recommended learning game for preschoolers
by Pratik Machchar

Category: Education, Family, Games, Educational
Requirements: Compatible with iPhone3GS-iPhone-3GS, iPadWifi-iPadWifi, iPad3G-iPad3G, iPodTouchThirdGen-iPodTouchThirdGen, iPhone4-iPhone4, iPodTouchFourthGen-iPodTouchFourthGen, iPad2Wifi-iPad2Wifi, iPad23G-iPad23G, iPhone4S-iPhone4S, iPadThirdGen-iPadThirdGen, iPadThirdGen4G-iPadThirdGen4G, iPhone5-iPhone5, iPodTouchFifthGen-iPodTouchFifthGen, iPadFourthGen-iPadFourthGen, iPadFourthGen4G-iPadFourthGen4G, iPadMini-iPadMini, iPadMini4G-iPadMini4G, iPhone5c-iPhone5c, iPhone5s-iPhone5s, iPadAir-iPadAir, iPadAirCellular-iPadAirCellular, iPadMiniRetina-iPadMiniRetina, iPadMiniRetinaCellular-iPadMiniRetinaCellular, iPhone6-iPhone6, iPhone6Plus-iPhone6Plus, iPadAir2-iPadAir2, iPadAir2Cellular-iPadAir2Cellular, iPadMini3-iPadMini3, iPadMini3Cellular-iPadMini3Cellular, iPodTouchSixthGen-iPodTouchSixthGen, iPhone6s-iPhone6s, iPhone6sPlus-iPhone6sPlus, iPadMini4-iPadMini4, iPadMini4Cellular-iPadMini4Cellular, iPadPro-iPadPro, iPadProCellular-iPadProCellular, iPadPro97-iPadPro97, iPadPro97Cellular-iPadPro97Cellular, iPhoneSE-iPhoneSE, iPhone7-iPhone7, iPhone7Plus-iPhone7Plus, iPad611-iPad611, iPad612-iPad612, iPad71-iPad71, iPad72-iPad72, iPad73-iPad73, iPad74-iPad74
Size: 82.02 MB

$3.99USD

Screenshots
(Click to enlarge)
Screenshots for iPad
(Click to enlarge)

 

Lisa is a Speech Language Pathologist who has been working in an inclusive school system for over 32 years. She works with children that have issues in all areas of speech and language. She loves her work and is always looking for ways to integrate technology.
 Rhetoric Public Speaking by John Zimmer and Florian Mueck – Review

Rhetoric Public Speaking by John Zimmer and Florian Mueck – Review



image

What we love…

Various options for narrative formation.

What we’d love to see…

Ability to choose/skip topics or make your own, option to record speeches for review, a junior version of the app.

Summary

A public speaking board game that presents lots of possibilities in practicing expressive language and narratives. Particularly useful for older children or adult clients in speech therapy.

Our Rating

Rhetoric Public Speaking Game is an app developed by the creators of Rhetoric-The Public Speaking Game (John Zimmer and Florian Mueck). The original board game was released in 2012 and was a huge success. It was made to help those with a desire to increase public speaking skills. The creators have now released an app that reflects the benefits of the board game. The purpose of this review will be to write about how this app can be used by Speech Language Pathologists in therapy.

When I first looked at the app, my impression was that this is for much older players. The description was more about how to prepare for debates and public speaking engagements. As I explored and played through, I realized that there are many ways to adapt it for practicing expressive language and narratives. The app needs to be monitored and set up by an adult, which is actually a good thing, as it encourages interactions between the clinician and the student.

Game play itself is relatively easy. The game can be played by 2 to 8 people at a time. A great feature is that the game supports multiple different languages (English, Spanish, French, German and Catalan; with more languages to come). Default time is set to a minimum of 1 minute, but can be adjusted to 2 minutes. There are 2 styles to the game, competitive or not. In the competitive mode, the other players are the ones that determine the score. In therapy, this can be useful in teaching the kids how to give constructive criticism and even compliments.

Opening the app results in a black home page with no illustrations. 3 options are there: Rules, Play and About. Of course, it is really important to read the rules before even trying to play. If you go straight to play option, you will be lost. The rule section is long and somewhat complicated, as it explains each space on the game board. Right from this page, I knew that I would need to create a cheat sheet to have handy during play.

The game begins with an “audience” waiting to hear speeches. Each speaker has a marker, poised at the “entrance”. The players roll a dice, move to a space on the board, on which they are asked to participate in a speech task according to 4 categories – Topic, Challenge, Question, Reflection. The game continues until a player exits the “stage”.

When your marker lands on Topic, you pick a card that gives you the topic of your speech. Then you need to create your narrative to include one of 6 fields or tasks: Tell a story, Use a quote, Evoke the Senses, Draw an Analogy, Use Humor, Call to Action. Each of these is explained in the rules section (hence, the cheat sheet). If your marker stops at Challenge, you have to respond to that specific challenge (e.g. You are the host of a TV game show. Introduce the other players as the contestants).

When you land on Question, any player can ask you a question about anything and you have to structure your answer based on the result of your spin on the Wheel of Structure. Structures like ‘Good, Better, Best’; ‘Bad, Worse, Worst’; ‘Past, Present, Future’; ‘One, Two, Three’ and ‘Pros and Cons’ help you organize your thoughts and deliver an impressive speech. One last area is Reflection, where you can choose to talk about anything within the time limit.

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Once the game starts, it is pretty intuitive, with the speaker just having to tap a card to bring you to the next “task”. Card selection is random, so you never know what will pop up. Subjects range from appropriate for younger kids, to rather older in nature (speak about something in the room to deliver your own eulogy). It would be nice to be able to customize the cards for the target population. Once you are ready to speak, the timer is revealed and when speech is completed you tap the check mark to end your turn. Play continues with the next speaker.

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As you can see, once you are familiar with the different spaces on the board and the different tasks, the app can actually be a lot of fun. In therapy, I would delay the actual speaking part to help the student create a visual BrainFrame or use components of other narrative programs (SKILLS, SGM) to help organize thoughts and create a narrative. I would also limit the tasks that they can choose from, to make it more appropriate for the clients playing the game. An option that I would change to help with this idea, is to allow the speaker to use a field more than once. Recording the students while speaking would also be a great asset to therapy. The clinician can go back and review the elements of the narrative that were covered or missed.

Getting students to actually use expressive language in a structured activity is a difficult task at the best of times. The chance to incorporate this skill into a board game is an excellent addition to treatment. Students react well to electronics and the somewhat competitive board game nature of Rhetoric. There is also no real “judgements” made about the speech which is great.

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I can also see the validity of working with adult aphasia clients that have been in therapy for a while. They too would probably like the game nature of this app. I would think the stress level of having to create narratives will be lessened by having topics and structures presented to them. If possible, recording the narrative to go back and review would be great as well.

There are a lot of things I like about this app (if used with the right demographics). The different language options is for sure a really big plus. The multiple player setup is great for group sessions. The simple design of the board game makes it easy to play and allows the clients to move ahead towards the finish quickly. There are multiple different options for narrative formation. The non-competitive version of the game allows for excellent client feedback and gives the clinician lots of opportunities for direct teaching of narrative formation.

What I would like to see is the ability to choose the topics for the speeches or even to make your own. Another option is for the developers to make a junior version. That would be awesome!!!! I would like to be able to skip a card if it doesn’t seem appropriate. The developers have mentioned that more languages and specific theme topics are coming soon so then maybe then it will be easier to choose. I would also like to see an option to record the speeches to review later.

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Rhetoric Public Speaking Game

Rhetoric Public Speaking Game Rhetoric Public Speaking Game by John Zimmer
Category: Games, Board, Education, Educational
Requirements: Compatible with iPhone3GS-iPhone-3GS, iPhone4-iPhone4, iPodTouchFourthGen-iPodTouchFourthGen, iPad2Wifi-iPad2Wifi, iPad23G-iPad23G, iPhone4S-iPhone4S, iPadThirdGen-iPadThirdGen, iPadThirdGen4G-iPadThirdGen4G, iPhone5-iPhone5, iPodTouchFifthGen-iPodTouchFifthGen, iPadFourthGen-iPadFourthGen, iPadFourthGen4G-iPadFourthGen4G, iPadMini-iPadMini, iPadMini4G-iPadMini4G, iPhone5c-iPhone5c, iPhone5s-iPhone5s, iPadAir-iPadAir, iPadAirCellular-iPadAirCellular, iPadMiniRetina-iPadMiniRetina, iPadMiniRetinaCellular-iPadMiniRetinaCellular, iPhone6-iPhone6, iPhone6Plus-iPhone6Plus, iPadAir2-iPadAir2, iPadAir2Cellular-iPadAir2Cellular, iPadMini3-iPadMini3, iPadMini3Cellular-iPadMini3Cellular, iPodTouchSixthGen-iPodTouchSixthGen, iPhone6s-iPhone6s, iPhone6sPlus-iPhone6sPlus, iPadMini4-iPadMini4, iPadMini4Cellular-iPadMini4Cellular, iPadPro-iPadPro, iPadProCellular-iPadProCellular, iPadPro97-iPadPro97, iPadPro97Cellular-iPadPro97Cellular, iPhoneSE-iPhoneSE, iPhone7-iPhone7, iPhone7Plus-iPhone7Plus, iPad611-iPad611, iPad612-iPad612, iPad71-iPad71, iPad72-iPad72, iPad73-iPad73, iPad74-iPad74
Size: 85.86 MB

$6.99USD

 

 

Lisa is a Speech Language Pathologist who has been working in an inclusive school system for over 32 years. She works with children that have issues in all areas of speech and language. She loves her work and is always looking for ways to integrate technology.
My Playhome Hospital by PlayHome Software Ltd – Review

My Playhome Hospital by PlayHome Software Ltd – Review



 

What we love…

Endless hours of imaginative play, learning and therapy options. I love that My Playhome Hospital easily integrates with other Playhome apps.

What we’d love to see…

More flexibility in characters, ability to record narratives, better sensitivity for the placed items.

Summary

An interactive app that familiarizes children with the workings and people in the hospital setting. Multiple different scenes with many opportunities to interact with the objects and characters on each page.

Our Rating

My PlayHome HospitalIn the fantastic tradition of the Playhome Software Company, comes the latest My Playhome app, My Playhome Hospital. Fully integrated with the other My Playhome apps (Home, School and Store), this new app allows the player to explore all aspects of the hospital experience. When the app is opened, the child is faced with the view of the hospital and an ambulance. No settings tab, no external options, and no parental tab. The only extra button to press is the Tidy the Hospital wheel, which is a great option. It allows the player to actually erase the previous designs created and start fresh. The home page ambulance can be driven to the school, home or store; linking the other apps (one of my favorite features).

As with the other Playhome apps there are numerous different characters to add to your hospital scenario. Characters to choose from are moms and dads, children of various ages, doctors, nurses and hospital workers. Different ethnicities and races are also represented, although limited in number. The characters can be placed in various different, well decorated settings found throughout the hospital, each with different activities to explore; at the registration desk, children can try out the business equipment (fax, phone), use the wheelchairs, and interact with the receptionist. Next the arrow takes you to the small gift cart where there are balloons, magazines, flowers and other objects. This is the page where the elevator is located that allows the child to move to the second floor of the hospital, where they will find hospital rooms, the X-ray department and the break room/ kitchen. Moving forward is the waiting room, and emergency/hospital room (hospital beds). As with the other rooms, the kids can practice being doctor and patient (take blood, have X-rays or even make food). Each room has unique objects. One of the criticisms that I have with this and other Playhome apps, is that the movement and placement of the objects is too sensitive or not accurate at all. (In this app, the people cannot hold the telephone or the pencil; when changing clothes or trying to add items into their hands, the objects often land up on the floor). The characters bend to sit and can be placed in a lying down position. However, they cannot shift position to face either left or right, and arms cannot bend.

There is background/ambiance noise throughout MyPlayhome Hospitla, which changes only minimally from room to room. It would be nice to be able to turn the noise on or off within each room. As well, it would be nice to be able to change the sounds or videos on the various TVs found in the hospital.

There are so many things I like about this app. My favorite part of the MyPlayhome Hospital app is the way the app links with the other Playhome apps (I love them all) either with the ambulance or with the characters. Moving characters between the house, the store, the school and this hospital encourages hours of play and multiple different story situations. The arrow on each page make navigation intuitive and quick. Add to this, the multiple different characters and each page becomes a story of its own. There are enough people to have doctors, patients and hospital workers interact and participate in the multitude of actions in each setting. The ability to tidy the Hospital on the opening of each play session allows for even more hours of original play.

There are a few things that I would like to see in future updates. There are certain actions that require fine tuning. The characters cannot hold the telephone or the pencil. When items do not “stay where put”, they fall to the floor, which is kind of annoying. The people within the app are only able to sit, stand and lie down. It would be great if they could be made more flexible, perhaps bending arms and legs; they also can also face in one direction. Would be nice to be able to have them face in both directions. Of smaller importance for overall play, but yet a “wish” would be to be able to change the channel on the TVs and perhaps actually choose what we can order in the vending machine. Adding activities for the kids to do in the waiting room, would also add some reality to the app coloring book, abacus style toys). This waiting room is really an adult waiting room area. Settings to change the background music in each room would also be an added asset. As an Speech Language Pathologist, one of the biggest items on my wish list would be the ability to record a narrative over any of the scenes.

There are no external links and no IAP. There are Playhome web sites and Facebook pages that provide ideas for learning and play. An app well worth its price!!! Therapy and learning possibilities for this app are endless. Using this app to help familiarize a child who may be going to the hospital for either a checkup or an actual procedure, will certainly help to lessen the anxiety and stress. I use the Playhome apps to work on sequencing, vocabulary, comprehension and narratives. I have taken screen shots of the amazing scenes the students have made and used them for other sessions or to send home as a home practice sheet. My Playhome Hospital appealed to all the age levels of my caseload. I recommend this series of apps to all my families. It lends itself to both family and individual play. There are hours of enjoyment and entertainment within this and every Playhome app. My Playhome Hospital is surely going to become one of my go to apps for therapy. 5 star rating from this reviewer!!!!


My PlayHome Hospital My PlayHome Hospital by PlayHome Software Ltd

Price: $2.99 USD

* #1 Best Selling Kids App in over 50 countries!
* Editor's Choice Award - Children's Technology Review
* 5 stars - Common Sense media
* Best Pick Award - TechWithKids.com
* 5 stars - PappasAppar.

 

Lisa is a Speech Language Pathologist who has been working in an inclusive school system for over 32 years. She works with children that have issues in all areas of speech and language. She loves her work and is always looking for ways to integrate technology.
 Dr. Seuss’s ABC – Read & Learn – Dr. Seuss by Oceanhouse Media – Review

Dr. Seuss’s ABC – Read & Learn – Dr. Seuss by Oceanhouse Media – Review



iPad Screenshot 2

What we love…

audio with all sorts of different character names and vocabulary, narration when words are touched

What we’d love to see…

ability to slow down the pages in autoplay so kids can engage with them more more easily

Summary

Perfect for early elementary school kids who are just learning to read as well as preschool. Highly recommend it for younger children and those beginning to read.

Our Rating

Dr. Seuss's ABC - Read & Learn - Dr. Seuss

In the true tradition of Oceanhouse Media book apps, Dr. Seuss’s ABC is a rich, engaging, vibrant rendition of the book.  The graphics are brightly animated and encourage the child to touch, tap and repeat. The children can hear or read the little vignettes associated with each letter of the alphabet and are encouraged to seek out hidden words and stars that lead them to alphabet game play. I suggest this book for younger children or those just beginning to learn to read.

On the home page, there is access to a drop down menu, depicted by a book icon.  When you touch the book, an icon toolbar is revealed.  On this task bar, you will find buttons for other Dr. Seuss apps, the Parent section, the Settings and a page by page layout of the ABC book itself.  The external buttons are protected, but only by a swipe; the settings are not protected with a parental gate. The Parent section explains the objectives of the app and lets you see and reset the reading stats (minutes read, pages read and book read). There are also links on this page to Help and FAQ (support and contact info), and info about Oceanhouse Media, Dr. Seuss Enterprises and the Seussville web site.

The settings option allows customizing the app for mode of play and the different interactive elements (activities, music and sound, news and alerts, picture words). These elements can be turned on and off and reset (I do not suggest turning the Picture Words off as this is a very engaging and educational part of the app).

The app features three different modes of play: Read to Me, Read it Myself, and Auto Play. In Read to Me, a pleasant voice reads the page and waits for the child to turn the page manually by tapping the forward moving arrow. In Read by Myself, there is no voice over and the child turns the page at will. If they are emergent readers, and get stuck on a word, there is the option to tap the word and have it read to you. Auto Play reads and flips the pages automatically. The script on the pages are animated and the children are encourage to find the hidden star (which leads them to game play) by tapping on the page. There is a small replay button located next to the text, so the page can be reread.  Each page is turned by tapping the arrow that points right. There is an arrow on the left to return to the previous page.  Once the child or parent has heard the words, the child has the chance to touch various objects on the page to hear words and to find a star.

In Auto Play the story is read to you and the pages are turned automatically.  In the settings there is a switch to “delay page turning”.  If this is not selected the pages turn quickly and don’t give the child a whole lot of time to touch and explore. On the top of the Auto Play pages there is a circle, which when pressed for 5 seconds, turns off Auto Play.

When a star is tapped, one of a variety of different letter games appears; Smart Start: Tap the animal that begins with the letter; Big Letters: find the big letter; Little Letters: find the little letter; Big and Little: Find the big or little letter; Super Sort: Drag each letter to the corresponding box. Games are short and maintain the child’s attention.  There is no negative feedback for incorrect responses.

I really love the audio portion of this app.  The pages are laden with unique alliterations for the character names (Zizzer-Zazzer-Zuzz, Rosy Robin Ross) and rich in vocabulary.  Each word is individually narrated when touched, so I child can be prompted to press a word you suggest or to replay any word they choose. One thing that I really like on each page is that when the child taps on a picture of a word in the story, the corresponding word changes color in the script.  I really like that there is the ability to reset the stats, hints and learning activities. This way, the app can be reused for different children or even for the same child to do the activities more that once. The app is full of engaging graphics, vibrant colors, and animated characters. The kids love the funny looking creatures and make believe names.  There are multiple exposures to the pre-literacy skills of phonemic awareness and rhyming; a much loved aspect of all Dr. Seuss’s works.  A very interesting addition to this app, is that it incorporates a higher level of vocabulary and nonsense words.  This helps to enhance the sound- symbol connections and allows the children the chance to decode a blend phonemes. When the child taps a picture corresponding to a word in the story, the word changes color, combining auditory and visual feedback. You can also hear single words or the whole page read again.  I really enjoyed the ability to reset the stats, hints and learning activities. This way, the app can be reused for different children or even for the same child to do the activities more that once.

As with all other Dr. Seuss books, the pre-literacy skills are fabulously addressed. The concepts of rhyming and phonemic awareness are dealt with on each page. The presenting voice is pleasant and she enunciates each phoneme clearly and with intonation.

I am a big fan of the Oceanhouse Media Dr. Seuss Book apps.  Dr. Seuss’s ABC is no exception.  From the vibrant graphics and the animated characters, to the Learning activities and the script, each page is engaging and educational.  I give this app a 5 star rating and highly recommend it for younger children and those beginning to read. Like most of the other Dr. Seuss books adapted by Oceanhouse Media, the interface is very user friendly.  The Learning Activities are quick and engaging. All responses are spoken, whether correct or incorrect, so the appearance of negative feedback is not present.

Dr. Seuss's ABC - Read & Learn
Dr. Seuss's ABC - Read & Learn
by Oceanhouse Media

Category: Books, Education
Requirements: Compatible with iPad2Wifi-iPad2Wifi, iPad23G-iPad23G, iPhone4S-iPhone4S, iPadThirdGen-iPadThirdGen, iPadThirdGen4G-iPadThirdGen4G, iPhone5-iPhone5, iPodTouchFifthGen-iPodTouchFifthGen, iPadFourthGen-iPadFourthGen, iPadFourthGen4G-iPadFourthGen4G, iPadMini-iPadMini, iPadMini4G-iPadMini4G, iPhone5c-iPhone5c, iPhone5s-iPhone5s, iPadAir-iPadAir, iPadAirCellular-iPadAirCellular, iPadMiniRetina-iPadMiniRetina, iPadMiniRetinaCellular-iPadMiniRetinaCellular, iPhone6-iPhone6, iPhone6Plus-iPhone6Plus, iPadAir2-iPadAir2, iPadAir2Cellular-iPadAir2Cellular, iPadMini3-iPadMini3, iPadMini3Cellular-iPadMini3Cellular, iPodTouchSixthGen-iPodTouchSixthGen, iPhone6s-iPhone6s, iPhone6sPlus-iPhone6sPlus, iPadMini4-iPadMini4, iPadMini4Cellular-iPadMini4Cellular, iPadPro-iPadPro, iPadProCellular-iPadProCellular, iPadPro97-iPadPro97, iPadPro97Cellular-iPadPro97Cellular, iPhoneSE-iPhoneSE, iPhone7-iPhone7, iPhone7Plus-iPhone7Plus, iPad611-iPad611, iPad612-iPad612, iPad71-iPad71, iPad72-iPad72, iPad73-iPad73, iPad74-iPad74
Size: 39.01 MB

$1.99USD

Screenshots
(Click to enlarge)
Screenshots for iPad
(Click to enlarge)

Lisa is a Speech Language Pathologist who has been working in an inclusive school system for over 32 years. She works with children that have issues in all areas of speech and language. She loves her work and is always looking for ways to integrate technology.

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